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    Top 25 Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs To Keep You Going

    21 May 2018, 12:00 am

    There are many more entrepreneurs of color than ever. According to the Minority Business Development Agency, “Minority-owned businesses grew more than four times as fast as U.S. firms overall between 1992 and 1997, increasing from 2.1 million to about 2.8 million firms, according to a report released today [PDF] by the Commerce Department’s Census Bureau.” And over the last approximately 18 years, black women-owned firms grew 322%. Great news, but it’s tough launching a small business. As  Rainy Hamilton Jr., the co-founder of Hamilton Anderson Associates, a 100% minority-owned Detroit-based firm said about starting a business, ” There will be long days and nights, anxiety, worry, obstacles, politics— both in-house and out—and many, many other challenges” Maybe you are feeling particularly challenged as an entrepreneur. Sometimes you just need a word of encouragement. Well, we got you, Here are 25 motivational quotes for entrepreneurs from other diverse entrepreneurs to keep you inspired and focused.

    And if you need even more motivation or specific advice such as how to get your business minority-certified, we have the resources for entrepreneurs and small business owners to help you. Check out:

    7 TOP GRANTS OR FREE MONEY FOR BLACK WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

    FREE MONEY? THE TOP 10 GRANTS AVAILABLE TO BLACK, MINORITY BUSINESS OWNERS

    7 WAYS TO FUND YOUR STARTUP

    BLACK ENTERPRISE’S ULTIMATE GUIDE FOR SMALL BUSINESS

     

    25 Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

     

     

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    (iStock.com)

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    (iStock)

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs

    The post Top 25 Motivational Quotes For Entrepreneurs To Keep You Going appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    Meghan Markle Has Brits Flying the Biracial Flag, But Will Americans Do The Same?

    20 May 2018, 10:49 pm

    A lot has been made of the potential for Meghan Markle to disrupt the status quo for women, and black women, in particular.

    No sooner did we learn her new title—the Duchess of Sussex—than she was playfully nicknamed the Duchess of Success. But success for whom, I wondered? Resulting in what?

    Meghan Markle and the Larger Scale 

    In the midst of #MeToo #TimesUp and the unapologetic return of feminism in full force, it felt oddly off-kilter—all this fuss over a very traditional wedding hyped in fairytale talk of a “commoner” bride being elevated by marriage to a prince. So, like many, I was skeptical. What would Markle’s marriage into the royal family really mean on a larger scale, if anything? Wait and see, I thought. Well, yesterday, I did.

    From the first glimpses of Markle and her mother, Doria Ragland, riding toward St. George’s chapel together, there was nothing common about the bride or the way she showed up. At 36, a child of divorce who was previously married herself, I was struck by her composure and self-containment, and I was transfixed by the whole affair.

    Why was I suddenly so caught up? Not because it was lovely (although it really was) but because the surprises abounded, from the bride’s “something blue” being the soles of her Aquazurra shoes to far more compelling notes that made this royal wedding something strikingly new.

    I was moved by the image of Ragland, beautiful, solitary, and clearly emotional, over her daughter’s shoulder as she recited her vows. I wished she was seated with a loved one, someone to hold her hand. She held her own, with enviable grace. Who could resist the children, the pageantry, the Kingdom Choir, the brilliant young cellist? But what impacted me most in the midst of #BlackRoyalWedding was how the bride was consistently referred to as biracial – as if it was a normal, everyday thing. Except that it was not. At least, not before this wedding. And certainly not in this country, her native USA.

    In America, You Have to Choose

    Biracial was not an acceptable descriptor of choice when Barack Obama made history as the first black American president. Nor when Halle Berry was hailed for being the first black woman to win an Oscar for a lead actress role. Actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Mariah Carey, both of whose mothers—like Berry’s and Obama’s—are white or other, are also routinely referred to as black. In both cases, it wasn’t where they began when their celebrity status first hit. (At one time, being part Pacific Islander, was more Johnson’s public focal point.) But it’s how they’ve evolved. Because, in America, you have to choose.

    Drake, Misty Copeland, Lenny Kravitz, Alicia Keys, Colin Kaepernick, Jesse Williams, J. Cole, Jussie Smollett, Faith Evans, Sade, Bob Marley… the list of prominent celebrities who are biracial but identify as black is long. The list of biracial “commoners” is longer. Why must they self-select into one race and, in so doing, out of their other?

    The reasons behind it are ancient and current, complicated and painful, as is everything in our country involving race and color. Which is why we avoid confronting those reasons—still—even in a year when it seems everything is being thrown on the table as the call-out culture revs.

    Markle has never been confused about her identity. As she married a white prince on the most public day of her life, she rather boldly celebrated her innate blackness but she does not refer to herself as black, or white. Even as a child, she resisted the pressure to choose one of her races over the other, and she’s been crystal about the reasons why.

    In a 2015 Elle magazine article, Markle recounted her first confrontation with having to check a racial box on a form in the seventh grade. Her teacher told her to check the Caucasian box. “Because that’s how you look, Meaghan,” she said. “I couldn’t bring myself to do that,” Markle wrote, recalling the sadness she knew her mother would feel if she did. Instead, she drew a small question mark then put down her pen, devastated.

    When Markle told her father about it, his instructions were liberating: “If that happens again, you draw your own box.” And so she has, steadfastly refusing to be labeled as anything more limiting than what she is, a mixed race, or biracial, woman.

    It seems so obvious. In an age of heightened sensibilities about micro-aggressions, in an era when #representationmatters and we have created a new nomenclature for people to self-identify a full range of previously unacknowledged gender and sexual preferences, how ridiculous is it that we can’t get comfortable with people owning all that they are racially?

    The sad truth is, particularly in American culture, where white and black have been at odds for so long, and where the dividing lines have in some ways deepened in recent years, nothing is as simple, as rational or right as it should be.

    If a biracial person is white-leaning in their identity, they are accused of trying to pass. They are more likely to identify black because their appearance (regardless of skin tone) largely dictates their experience, and there is no confusing the black American experience with any other. But those who choose to identify as mixed, are suspect and often seen as being disloyal. We see them as somehow attempting to deny what they are—the black part, specifically—instead of affirming all that they are.

    Perhaps that’s why yesterday’s royal wedding was the perfect platform for this moment. Because on such occasions, even the most cynical among us tend to get drawn into the shimmering beauty and hopefulness of it all. And it helped that it didn’t take place on American soil. Maybe from this distance, we could see that when Markle walked down that aisle, toward her African American mother on one side, and her new royal in-laws on the other, she embraced and embodied all of it and, by extension, all of us.

    Markle gave us a storybook wedding, but her handling of the details shows her keen awareness of its larger impact. She knows that monarchies and their marriages are all about safeguarding the future of the lineage and this lineage will now be definitively multiracial. She is doing her part to create room for her biracial children to have a different experience than she has.

    Whatever else Markle has achieved in her life so far, it is no small feat that the massive worldwide press bowed to her will yesterday, embracing her multiracial identity, and labeling it as precisely that.

    Her newly royal status offered her the ability to compel that shift in a way that even her TV celebrity, frankly, never had, and she seized her giant moment on the world stage to make it happen. Having power is one thing; knowing how to use it is another. Perhaps Duchess of Success is already a fitting moniker, after all.

     

     

     

     

     

    The post Meghan Markle Has Brits Flying the Biracial Flag, But Will Americans Do The Same? appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    The 5 Rules of Style for On-Point Women’s Business Attire

    20 May 2018, 8:00 pm

    Style is everything. It can be the difference between you having an immaculate or exceptionally crappy day. Black Enterprise caught up with Stylist & CEO of Immaculate Wardrobe, Sophia Hyacinthe, who has built an incredible women’s styling business with over 13 years of styling experience, working with women CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies, publishing industry powerhouses, and girl bosses all over New York City. Hyacinthe offers business attire styling tips to freshen up that drab everyday work outfit, especially if your job requires you to be suited or “work professional” day in and day out.

    The 5 Rules of Chic Business Attire Style

    Fit First

    Put fit first as it is the foundation to any look. Pick shapes and lines that best flatter your body. Prominent shapes in tailored womenswear include: cropped skinny pants, wide leg culottes, fitted pencil skirts, and A-line midis. Once you’ve found your perfect shape, I always recommend visiting a tailor to have them make any adjustments to ensure that it is truly the perfect fit. It’s the little touches like raising or lowering a hemline and taking in the waist that really customizes and refines the look.

    business attire

    (iStock/Photography Firm)

     

    Suiting Remixed

    Classic suiting has been given a fresh spin with bold colors and sticking prints. Crayola-esque hues along with pastels are major this season. For a simpler approach, pair bright separates with muted tones and for a more fashion-forward look, go all out and sport the full bright look. Praiseworthy prints include vintage floral designs along with traditional menswear suiting prints. For a more tamed approach, pair printed pieces with cool neutrals or for a more daring look, mix contrasting prints. The key to mixing prints is pairing some that share similar color themes.

    (iStock/Nomad)

     

    Best Foot Forward

    This is the area where you really get to express individual style, whether you’re an avid flat wearer, sneaker fiend, or strictly a stiletto girl, you get to really have fun in this department. Use your shoes to express your best self. Shoe trends worth stomping for include ’80s-style pumps, dad sneakers, along with solid white and bold colors.

    business attire

    (iStock/macroworld)

     

    Brilliant Blouses

    Maximize work staples with a rotation of fun blouses. Designers are taking it up a notch with exaggerated sleeves, intricate collars, and form-flattering wrap styles. With summer approaching, opt for these styles in lightweight linen fabrics.

    business attire

    (iStick/Maksym Azovtsev)

     

    All About Accessories

    Accessories add personal flair and serve to really elevate the look. Noteworthy accessories include waist belts that layer perfectly over blazers and dresses. Mixed metals, a silver watch, a gold bracelet, no problem. And lastly, carry your work files in style with this season’s patterned “it” bags.

    business attire

    (iStock/ajr_images)

    The post The 5 Rules of Style for On-Point Women’s Business Attire appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    This Ex-Googler Designs Some of the Coolest Nigerian Office Spaces

    20 May 2018, 4:00 pm

    Through Spacefinish, a design and innovation company based in Lagos, Nigeria, founder Remi Dada wants to make every Nigerian office as innovative as their counterparts in Silicon Valley. Dada’s goal is to bring the Valley to Africa by redesigning office spaces for both startups and established companies.

    Dada started his career wanting to be a rapper but things took an interesting turn. As he grew older, he realized that his passion for rap music was centered around creating something out of nothing; whether it was creating a product, a building, or an experience that other people could interact with. This led him to pursue a career in architecture, obtaining a degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    After graduating, Dada quickly realized that architects were marginalized because they failed to acquire business skills. This led him to enroll in business school. With the passion for design still burning in his heart after business school, he turned down a high-paying job at Oracle to take on a job on the corporate side of fast food restaurant Chick-fil-A.

    “The Oracle job was going to pay me a lot of money, however, it wasn’t a job that would allow me to do the things that I was passionate about and I got an opportunity to do that at Chick-fil-A,” he recalls. At the restaurant, Dada was responsible for transforming the space’s user experience—and he loved every part of it.

    Dada eventually left the company and was offered a position at Google. “It was even more exciting because it wasn’t just Google, it was Google in Africa so I was super pumped up,” Dada told Techpoint.ng.

    After spending three years at Google and two more as B2C Product Marketing Head at YouTube Sub-Saharan Africa, Dada felt that it was time to start something of his own. This is when Spacefinish was born. The cool part was, he didn’t have to leave Google to do it. One of the reasons why Google is one of the most innovative companies in the world is that it gives its employees the freedom to work on side projects.

    They’ve implemented a program called, “20% time or project,” which allows employees one full day per week (20% of their time) to work on a Google-related passion project of their choice. This strategy birthed many Google products we now use including AdSense, Google Maps, Google Talk, Gmail, and Google Nigeria’s cool office, Dada’s then-side project. People were so impressed with the results that he began to get requests to design other offices.

    Google Office in Nigeria designed by Remi Dada (Image: Techpoint)

    Google Office in Nigeria designed by Remi Dada (Image: Techpoint)

    Dada eventually broke away from Google and within one year of running Spacefinish, he now has a team of seven who have designed the offices for a number of Nigerian companies that not only include tech companies and startups but, banks such as Stanbic IBTC’s Blue Lab, Sterling Bank, Ventures Garden Group and 21st Century Technology Limited among others.

     

    The post This Ex-Googler Designs Some of the Coolest Nigerian Office Spaces appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    BE Modern Man: Meet ‘Mr. Sportsman’ Randall ‘R.J.’ Harris

    20 May 2018, 2:00 pm

    BE Modern Man is an integrative program that honors the essence, image, and accomplishments of today’s man of color. With features of today’s leaders, executives, creatives, students, politicians, entrepreneurs, professionals, and agents of change—these men share the common thread of creating a new normal while setting the bar in tech, art, philanthropy, business, and beyond. The BE Modern Man is making a positive impact, his way, and has a story to tell.

    BE MODERN MAN RANDALL “R.J.”  HARRIS

    Age: 28

    Profession: Sports and Entertainment Marketing, Entrepreneur, Adviser

    One Word That Describes You: Creative

    What does being one of the BE Modern Man 100 Honorees mean to you?

    As a kid growing up, I remember my father reading Black Enterprise on a daily basis as a rising entrepreneur. To be honored by such a prestigious publication in our community, I feel humbled by the recognition and inspired to continue to develop as a business leader.

    What are you doing as a BEMM to help support black male achievement now or in the future?

    I have been blessed to have the opportunity to work in the highly competitive sports and entertainment industry. Despite the high percentage of black athletes on the court/field, it is difficult to get your foot in the corporate door of many sports organizations. This shortage has been a driving force for the mentorship role I have played with a number of young minority professionals and students that I have worked with to find job opportunities. Additionally, I founded a mentorship program called “Locked In” with a group of like-minded friends to help develop students through key principles that will help them excel in life.

    What are some examples of how you turned struggle into success?

    Early in my career, I was working for a sports marketing agency called Fenway Sports Management (FSM) that owned the Boston Red Sox, Liverpool FC, and a strategic partnership with LRMR Marketing. Being one of the younger representatives within the company, the larger corporate accounts were managed by the senior executives in the organization. To succeed, I had to develop a strategy for a path that would be met with the least resistance. I created my own lane within the company through identifying burgeoning technology startups (e.g., Airbnb) and helping them scale their business through developing creative sports marketing platforms. Based on the marketing partnerships I forged, I was able to demonstrate to the sports industry my ability to lead business negotiations from start to finish.

     

    What is your “Extraordinary Impact”?

    My extraordinary impact is through changing the narrative of what a black man in sports looks like. One of the most challenging aspects of our community is a lack of exposure to certain industries. Through excelling behind the scenes, I have been able to help create openings into the industry for diverse candidates.

    What is an important quality you look for in your relationships with others?

    Energy, Respect, Integrity, Authenticity, and Challenging Growth.

    What are some immediate projects you are working on?

    Currently, I am working for Oak View Group (OVG), which was founded by Tim Leiweke (former AEG president) and backed by Azoff MSG Entertainment. We are developing and managing sports and live entertainment venues around the world, including new state-of-the-art arenas in Seattle ($600M+ redevelopment of KeyArena, NBA and NHL tenants) and Belmont, New York (partnership with the New York Islanders). Additionally, I am responsible for overseeing our agency relationship with the Portland Trail Blazers as we help them identify a corporate partner for their NBA Jersey Patch.

    What is the best advice you ever received?

    Forget networking and embrace relationship building. When you create connections based on shared interests and goals, you’ll be more successful at your job, because people want to work with people they know and like.

    What is some advice you have for other men who want to make a difference?

    You have the opportunity to make an impact in your own community. It’s our responsibility to uplift the next generation and we all have lessons that can help expose them to insights that can spark growth. Don’t wait for the right time when you can change people’s lives today.

    How do you prep for an important business meeting and/or event?

    I am a big advocate of preparation prior to business meetings. I believe in researching industry trends, recent news, and personal background on the people in the company. By leveraging research tools (e.g., LinkedIn, Twitter, Crunchbase) and industry publications (e.g., AdAge, Marketing Daily, Mashable, SportTechie), I usually feel confident on how to put together an effective strategy on the ways that I can create marketing and business solutions for brands.

    As a busy Modern Man, how do you unwind on vacation?

    I love to travel the world and experience different cultures. Last year, I went to Tokyo with some of my friends from Locked In. We had a great time exploring the culture, cuisine, and nightlife the city had to offer.

    If you could travel and stay anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

    I would have to say Ghana. My family completed our genealogy test and discovered our ancestors are from there. We have always wanted to visit our roots to better connect with our African heritage.

    Anything else you’d like to say?

    I would like to thank my parents for instilling the belief that I could accomplish anything that I put my mind to. Without their support and guidance, I wouldn’t be in the position that I am in today.

    It’s our normal to be extraordinary. Follow @BEModernMan and join the conversation using #BEModernMan.

    Come celebrate the BE Modern Man 100 Men of Distinction at the 2nd Annual Black Men XCEL, Aug. 29–Sept. 2, 2018, at PGA National Resort & Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

    The post BE Modern Man: Meet ‘Mr. Sportsman’ Randall ‘R.J.’ Harris appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    BE Modern Man: Meet ‘The Salesman’ Anthony Wilson

    20 May 2018, 12:00 am

    BE Modern Man is an integrative program that honors the essence, image, and accomplishments of today’s man of color. With features of today’s leaders, executives, creatives, students, politicians, entrepreneurs, professionals, and agents of change—these men share the common thread of creating a new normal while setting the bar in tech, art, philanthropy, business, and beyond. The BE Modern Man is making a positive impact, his way, and has a story to tell.

    BE MODERN MAN ANTHONY WILSON

    Age: 44

    Profession:  Divisional Sales Director, VMware Inc.

    One Word To Describe You: Resilient

    Social Media: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthonywilsonvmware

     

    What does being one of the BE Modern Man 100 Honorees mean to you?

    It’s an honor I am very proud of and it means that I’m getting noticed for doing what we as men are supposed to do—be committed to black families and help others while striving for success.

    What are you doing as a BEMM to help support black male achievement now or in the future?

    I would re-state my “extraordinary impact” statement here to answer this question. I also coach youth basketball and try to instill character, structure, and discipline as tools that will make the kids successful in hoops and in life.

    What are some examples of how you turned struggle into success?

    In 2017, I was passed over for five promotions. I spoke candidly with my HR team and my executive sponsor. I told them that I was not leaving the company despite what happened. I also told them I would no longer interview for leadership roles as the token diversity candidate. Two weeks later I had an offer for my current role and there was no formal interview process. But that resiliency and perseverance comes from my grandmother who came to America in the late 60s with five kids and no husband. She got a mortgage in a nice neighborhood when all women were being denied loans much less an immigrant seamstress from Jamaica. She built a linen business and everything I am today is built on the lessons learned from her: Adassa J Robinson.

    What is your “Extraordinary Impact?”

    I was the only black sales manager when I took the role in 2013. Since then, I’ve been directly responsible for bringing five other black male employees into the company: two worked directly for me and three in other business units. Three of the five are still with VMware and one of them is a strong candidate for a sales manager position. I’ll never settle to just “get mine” while others are in need of an opportunity. I’m not afraid to put my name on a candidate even if it doesn’t work out. On the personal side, I try to teach basic financial literacy to whoever needs it and will listen.

     

     

    What is an important quality you look for in your relationships with others?

    Respect, transparency, and fairness are the qualities that build lasting relationships for me. We may not always agree, but we must be respectful, fair, and open with each other.

    What are some immediate projects you are working on?

    I pull double duty as a facilitator for our new hire training classes. I’m building my skills as a certified sales trainer for phase two of my life. Once I exit corporate America, I plan to do sales coaching and training in between coaching high school golf and basketball while also teaching financial literacy to low-income groups. I’m doing some form of all those things now, but the plan is to make a living doing it in the next five to seven years.

    What is the best advice you ever received?

    There are two pieces of advice I try to live by. The first from my grandmother: ‘Nothing happens in the world until something is bought or sold. Be in the middle of that transaction and you will always be relevant.’ The second from U.S. President Grover Cleveland: ‘No man ever listened his way out of a job!’

    What is some advice you have for other men who want to make a difference?

    Just get started based on what you already know and what you’ve already done. We don’t all need special certifications or graduate degrees. If you’ve made something productive of yourself and you want to give back to others, then just start sharing your experiences.

    How do you prep for an important business meeting and/or event?

    I read as much as I can about who I’m meeting with or who will be at the event. For example, because I attended the Black Men XCEL Summit last year, I heard about and attended the Black Enterprise TechConneXt Summit in San Francisco. That’s my industry and I don’t see many like me so I wanted to network with others in the business. I researched the list of speakers and sought out Jessica O. Matthews of Uncharted Power based in Harlem. After her presentation, we talked about investor relations. After many more discussions, my business partner and I made a significant investment in her Series A round of funding.

    As a busy Modern Man, how do you unwind on vacation?

    Best unwinding experiences are with my son at certain sporting events. We did the ACC Basketball Tournament in DC. The ACC Football Championship game in Charlotte. We’re season ticket holders for the Miami Hurricanes homes games and that atmosphere in Miami is like a vacation every weekend. But our family vacations are still top of the list. Last year we did Utah for six days. None of us had ever been skiing. We did that plus snowmobiles and ice tubing. We topped it off with a 3-mile hike up 3,000 feet to a hot spring where only a few have visited. Incredible for a kid who was raised with no father and never had any family vacations

    If you could travel and stay anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

    I’ve yet to hit the motherland of Africa. I’d love to do a month on the continent visiting Morocco, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, South Africa, and Ethiopia. My heritage is diverse and we have family members from all those countries in Africa. I would love for that to be my son’s graduation gift. Forget Europe. Take it to the cradle of civilization!

    Anything else you’d like to say?

    I have to give a shout out to my wife Brett Carra who nominated me and encourages me to use my communications skills for more than just corporate. She too was in corporate sales and left to run her event planning business fulltime, Lady Brett Events. She does corporate and social events while also taking care of our son while I’m on the road. I couldn’t do this without her love and support. And speaking of family vacations, she’s the founder of FUNding Working Families (www.fundingfamilies.org). The non-profit works with community organizations and churches to find working families that do not have enough disposable income to take a family vacation. We bless them with an all-expenses paid 3 days / 2-night theme park vacation (Disney World, Universal Studios) for up to four family members. The goal is just to inspire these families that are working hard and doing the right thing but just don’t make enough to do that extra special family bonding thru a fun vacation. It’s another way we try to give back as a family unit. I’m honored to receive this award and recognition. I hope my story inspires others.

    It’s our normal to be extraordinary. Follow @BEModernMan and join the conversation using #BEModernMan.

    Come celebrate the BE Modern Man 100 Men of Distinction at the 2nd Annual Black Men XCEL, Aug. 29–Sept. 2, 2018, at PGA National Resort & Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida.

    The post BE Modern Man: Meet ‘The Salesman’ Anthony Wilson appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    5 Tips to Refresh Your Entrepreneurial Brand from Dr. Stacia Pierce

    19 May 2018, 8:00 pm

    There is tons of talk about “brand” these days, making it the new trendy buzzword in the entrepreneurial space. Well, the truth of the matter is, your brand is massively important as an entrepreneur, thus you want to be very clear on how the world sees you. The question that lingers for many is, how does one discover what their brand is?

    Black Enterprise caught up with Entrepreneurship Coach and Brand Expert Dr. Stacia Pierce to find out what she feels we need to do to connect to our brand. A little background on Pierce: she’s not just a coach; she is indeed a doctor and is taking a holistic approach to helping you discover and foster your entrepreneurial brand. 

    Dr Stacia Pierce, Entrepreneur and Brand Expert Life Coach (Image: Life Coach to Women)

    Dr. Stacia Pierce, Entrepreneur and Brand Expert Life Coach (Image: Life Coach to Women)

    Everyone goes through stagnant periods in their work—even me!” said Pierce. “I believe having a self-care routine that reduces stress and opens your mind to new possibilities is the most important step to finding that inner drive again.”

    Here are Pierce’s 5 Tips for Finding and Re-energizing Your Entrepreneurial Brand:

    Read, Read, Read!

    Books, magazines, and even Twitter are limitless sources to draw ideas from, gain insight, and learn more about an industry you’re interested in.

    Get Outside

    Fresh air, sunshine, and flowers awaken the senses and are a revitalizing way to calm the mind and slow down.

    Focus on Gratitude

    Being grateful is good for the soul and the mind. It encourages positive thoughts and can open up new opportunities when you share that gratitude with your clients.

    Make a Plan

    If you feel unsure of your next business steps, try following a roadmap. (Check out her Success Journal if you are in need of guidance. It has a place for every goal, challenge, and task alongside helpful prompts and tips.)

    Renew Your Mind 

    Read an inspirational biography, listen to an informative podcast, or enroll in a course and look for ways you can apply it in your own life.

    The post 5 Tips to Refresh Your Entrepreneurial Brand from Dr. Stacia Pierce appeared first on Black Enterprise.

    How to Turn Content into Clients

    19 May 2018, 4:00 pm

    Whether you’re looking to market your services or sell tickets to an event, one of the fastest ways to attract clients is to create valuable content. People don’t want to be sold anymore—they want to be engaged in meaningful conversation. So, from creating snackable content for Instagram to publishing YouTube videos or blog posts for your website or platforms like Medium—think of your content as a way to showcase your expertise, build trust with potential clients, and convince them to invest in your services without being pushy.

    Here are a five ways to turn your content into clients.

    1. Write an article (e.g., how-to, listicle), which solves a problem for your audience and include your byline. The article should be related to the product, service, or event you’re trying to market. At the end of the article, include a two- to three-sentence byline. A byline is an opportunity to showcase your expertise and convert a reader into a customer. However, it shouldn’t be overly promotional. Include at least two of the following: (a) details about the event, (b) your unique value proposition, and (c) a link to your website and social media sites.

    2. Introduce yourself using your unique value proposition. For instance, if you host a weekly Facebook Live or Periscope, start each video with your 10-second UVPa statement that describes how you solve your client’s problems and what makes you different from the competition. A good rule of thumb is to focus on how you can make your customers’ lives easier and the result they can expect from working with you.

    3. Create a content upgrade tied to the blog post topic. A content upgrade is additional material that provides bonus content for the reader in exchange for their email address. Examples of opt-ins include a guide which can provide steps, tips, and advice related to the content, a worksheet or template to help the reader apply what they read in your blog post, an invitation to a webinar related to the topic, or a call to action to get notified for the next article in a related series. Once you have a reader’s email address, it’s an opportunity to contact them directly about any upcoming sales or events related to your business.

    4. Create a challenge which focuses on how to help your audience overcome a common problem. Beyond engaging your audience, creating a community of like-minded individuals and growing your email list, challenges provide a great opportunity to tease an upcoming service or product event and entice potential customers to buy. Typically, challenges are five, seven, and 21 days. Examples include a five-day meditation and mindfulness challenge, 21-day goal setting and action challenge, or a 21-day workout challenge.

    5. Host a free webinar related to the topic of your product or service. Let’s say you planned to sell an online course in 20 days. You could host a free 30-minute webinar, which teaches one topic from your course, then summarize your webinar telling your audience about your upcoming paid course.

    6. Host a weekly, free LIVE video training on Facebook or Instagram leading up to your event. Typically you can focus your free training on audience challenges, barriers preventing your audiences from attending your event, common mistakes made on their journey to success, and why your topic is important.

    7. Include your “sales offer” on all of your social media profiles and include the direct link to your sales landing page. You can use services such as MailChimp (free but limited in terms of sales) and LeadPages (monthly payment required but tons of options for selling, embedding video and linking to Facebook ads).

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